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Upper Case W

 
 
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When the strokes on an upper case W cross. What is this called? What is the history? Anything anyone can elaborate on would be appreciated, thanks!

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Total Posts: 2

(bump)

Just wondering if there is a term for when the strokes of a W cross. Typologists out there know what this is called? Thanks!

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Total Posts: 9

Your question is tricky! I suppose—pragmatically—you may call them »Apex« and »Vertex« like the joining »areas« of the strokes of the »A« and the »V«.

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Total Posts: 4

Or maybe just an intersection. The history of W is well documented here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/W
As for why there’s an intersection: Try putting two V’s next to each other. The two most obvious solutions are still the most common W’s to this day.

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Total Posts: 9

@frank Your approach to the question is logical and comprehensible. Nevertheless, my German edition of Karen Cheng’s book »Designing Type« describes the serifed uppercase »W« as »VV-ligature« in three possible versions:

1.  two connected, condensed »Vs«
2.  two overlapping, extended »Vs«
3.  the right »V« intersects the left one

In the case of the serifed »W« the translator of Karen Cheng’s book, Henning Krause, uses the term intersection (Schnittpunkt) for the joining/intersecting area of the two »Vs«.  However, Karen Cheng doesn’t specifically name the »Vertices« of the two »Vs«, when connected to a serifed »W«.

In the case of the sans/grotesque »W« the translator uses the term »Scheitelpunkte« to describe all the joining areas/intersections. »Scheitel« means »Apex«, »Spitze« means »Vertex« depending, if you are talking about upper or lower »joining areas« of strokes (»A« or »V«).

Well, taking in consideration, that the »W« is a »VV-ligature« I would call the »joining area« of the ligature »Intersection« and the »joining areas« of the strokes of the two »Vs« »Vertices«, even if combined to a »W«.—Maybe, this is a logical solution.