Type News: What Mr. Kurtz Said

Several treats and a few terrors await you this week. First we bring you the nine levels of new type:

The lettering work of Thomas Lincoln has often shown his fascination with Roman majuscules. His newest design for Canada Type is Roma, a “proper Trajan sans” based on those historic carved capitals. Mind you, this is not simply a streamlined, sans-ified Roman. Roma consists of four weights, each with a finessed lowercase, small caps, and oldstyle figures. Six additional styles of capitals provide stackable options for shading and chromatic settings.

Please sir, may I have some more? More majuscules, that is. The mighty Richard Lipton’s latest take on the inscriptional style comes in the form of the calligraphic Canto. This family covers plenty of expressive ground — two weights, a uniquely fine-tuned lowercase, and multiple styles that progress from brush to pen to formal Roman.

Felix Braden’s Capri is a contemporary, “constructed sans” with a slight tip of the geometric topper to the clean lines of Futura and Avant Garde. Observe the use of basic forms throughout the four weight family — circles, squares, triangles — particularly in the rather staccato forms of the italic.

Condensed. Monospaced. Free. Prague-based graphic designer Filip Matejicek’s Donator is all that … and more. The “more” includes a lightweight grid, quirky connecting strokes, small caps, case-sensitive forms, and a unique set of swashy stylistic alternates. As the name implies … if you like it, donate a little bit to Filip.

Jeremy Dooley has expanded his Sommet superfamily yet again, this time with a slightly softened slab. The appropriately named Sommet Slab Rounded sports ample counters, “obliqued” serifs, and a handy selection of titling alternates across six weights and matching italics.

The streamlinish Atomic Age from James Grieshaber takes inspiration from mid-century automotive chromeography. Clean geometry and a rigid, upright stance form the bones of this unconnected throwback script. It’s also free … yet another open source face from the Google Web Fonts directory.

Hamburg-based Rekord has recently tossed out a pair of new releases. Mingray Mono is a stylish, three weight family equipped with a lot of features not necessarily associated with a fairly functional monospace. Keep an eye out for oldstyle figures, small caps, fractions, ligatures, plus a variety of pictograms and arrows.

Rekord’s second typeface is a high contrast sans by the name of Prestiggio. With plentiful alternates and unconventional ligatures, this elegant display face oozes more than its share of deco-esque charm.

From the bountiful pen of Laura Worthington comes Nelson—a rustic, weathered titling serif. It features a trio of “rugged” styles, each festooned with four sizes of capitals, alternates, swashes, and other decorative accoutrements.

We don’t have anything edible in the news this week, but we also won’t make you smell our feet

No werewolves were seen at TYPO London, but reports on that event are starting to sneak in. The TYPO London blog has an excellent set of resources in its retrospective. Joe Allam recaps Saturday’s happenings. If that weren’t enough, Will White has collected a ton of links. Next year, TYPO branches out to San Francisco.

And now let’s bob for the rest of this week’s news:

Thanks to Grant Hutchinson for bringing us this week’s new type and brains.

 

  • 1. Stephen Coles’s avatar Stephen Coles Oct 29, 2011

    That article about the 2012 Olympics typeface is really poor. There is an image of the logo, but the article is about the typeface — which they don’t show or link to, nor does Garfield mention its designer.

  • 2. Erik Vorhes’s avatar Erik Vorhes Nov 12, 2011

    You’re correct, Stephen. I think my sarcasm didn’t quite come through with “boldly.”

Comments are closed on this entry.

Subscribe for Updates

Blog RSS feed

Recent Entries

Categories

Archived Entries

2014
Jan
2013
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
2012
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec
2011
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec
2010
Jan
Feb
Apr
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec
2009
May
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec