Type News: Typeswimming

It’s almost spring! Time to get ready for sweet showers and all that. But first, a preemptive pilgrimage to some astounding new type!

In the 1930s and 1940s, masterful sign painter Alf Becker produced dozens of handcrafted type styles. Alejandro Paul used one of Becker’s incomplete sample alphabets as the basis for Storefront. True to form, Alejandro’s “overdose of alternates and swashes” is evident in this energetic script — balancing historical forms with the lettering artist’s improvised brushwork. Be sure to peruse the PDF specimen featuring some stunning dimensional work by Dado Queiroz.

Some people might refer to this face as having an oval structure, but Eric Olson prefers to call his Chrono a “nearly geometric” sans serif. This minimalist, six weight family has a subtly-played geometry that pairs well with the “adjusted oblique” italics. A single alternate ‘J’ and a series of directional arrows accompany each and every style.

The digital version of Vojtěch Preissig’s iconic Czech typeface began in the summer of 1998. After nearly fifteen years, František Štorm (along with Otakar Karlas) have finally released the revised and extended Preissig Antikva Pro. Previous interations of Antikva mistakenly construct the glyphs using nothing but straight lines. The accuracy of this revivial takes that into account, basing the design on a very specific version of the 1925 original and developing a set of custom-tuned italics. The entire family consists of twelve styles, partnered with a lovingly prepared set of Preissig’s original ornaments.

Sascha Timplan’s Florence for Stereotypes is loose, fluid, and — in his own words — “not perfect.” This condensed sans family was inspired by the designer’s poster lettering for the villaWuller dance club in Trier, Germany. With a casual softness, expressive swashes, and loads of OpenType options, Florence provides a lot of flexibility — perfect or not. And if you need yet another nudge, the regular weight can be nabbed for free at MyFonts.

Gestalten is on the scene again with Lektura — a modernized blackletter by Berlin-based Martin Guder. Two weights of organically grown, handcrafted flavour — straddling the line between interpretive antiqua and stripped-down textura.

The Lost Type Co-op released a pair of condensed, vintage serif faces this past week. Frances Macleod’s Abraham Lincoln is a tall drink of water — like its presidential namesake. Echoes of 19th century playbills are evident in this bracketed headliner of moderate contrast, friendly demeanor, and quirky woodtypish consistency.

Also from the “name your price” co-operative comes Ben Dalrymple’s four speed Geared — a compact, no-nonsense face with an industrial attitude. Although pitched as a “slab” design, the substantial serifs have a oddly attractive bracketed-hybrid vibe.

User is DSType’s take on a clean, squarish monospaced sans. This extensive family consists of regular, stencil, and “upright” styles across five weights — thin through bold — all with rather clever “cameo” variations. Despite being a monospaced design, it’s both versatile and extremely comfortable to read.

And now, feel free to get comfortable and read the rest of this week’s news:

It’s been another huge week in the world of type — see you next week for another!

Thanks to Grant Hutchinson for helping this week’s new type look its best!

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