Type News: The Anti-Aaron Burr

It’s another spectacular week for news and new type! Before we get started, though, we’d like to call your attention to a couple causes worthy of your support:

Speaking of the Hamilton, there’s good news from Two Rivers, Wisconsin, as well — but we wouldn’t want to spoil the new type for you.

All the type

Celebrating the launch of its nifty new site and hot on the heels of its inaugural American Chromatic release, the Hamilton Woodtype Foundry has unveiled another pair of 19th century treasures. The “very” condensed HWT Antique Tuscan No. 9 is the first digital version of this bifurcated beanpole to include a complete lowercase and extended European character set. HWT Borders One provides a decorative collection of “streamer” and border components in a similarly historical vein.

Fresh from the Gestalten font garage comes Andreas Søren Johansen’s Berg — a semi-traditional sans, packed with personality and designed with “a striking visual pitch” in mind. Somewhat organic transitions and terminals are pinched, flared, and otherwise spurred — echoing many of the idiosyncratic traits of the grotesque style. The family’s stance is condensed, but not uncomfortable — even in the beefiness of the black weight.

Jesse Ragan’s Export channels some unusual (and curiously attractive) handstyle lettering found on some discarded cardboard boxes. The quirky vernacular, unpolished charm, and limited character set has been gently rationalized, while “preserving the apparent chaos” of the original. Currently a work in progress and only available for selective licensing, Ragan plans on releasing a more robust edition down the road.

Billed as “The smallest thing to happen to Trivia Serif since Trivia” … Trivia Serif 10 is a diminutive extension to František Štorm’s “inconspicuous” text family. The details have been sweated and opticals optimized, making this tiny, two weight workhorse suitable for all manner and instance of long form text.

A jaunty, considered sans family, Lupa Sans Pro is fully equipped for complex typographic challenges. Designer Melle Diete provides a flexible range of weights from extra light through black with delicately feminine italics. Each member of the family includes multiple stylistic alternates, a subdued set of swash caps, and no less than seven ampersands per face.

We’re big fans of monospaced faces here at the Type News. So when Jörg Schmitt’s Ingrid Mono slid across our desk and tipped its typewriter topper — we were intrigued. This extensive, eight weight monolinear sans sports playful tails and terminals, consistent character widths across the entire range of styles, and a seriously jolly lowercase g.

Hanging around the extreme end of the angular geometry spectrum is John Moore’s Factor. Stripped down, rectilinear construction is combined with a just a hint of blackletter flavour. Four weights — including a graphic inline variation — include numerous clever alternates, ligatures, and dingbats.

All the news

Who are you calling a dingbat, Grant? Oh, well. Here’s this week’s news-related list:

And in case you hadn’t heard, there were some elections in the United States this week:

All the events

Well, a couple at least:

  • Beyond Tellerand takes place November 19–21 in Düsseldorf, Germany. Yves Peters takes a look at what’s in store.
  • Kerning, “the first Italian digital typography conference” takes place some time in Spring 2013. Stay tuned for details.
  • Opening November 12th, Berlin’s Mota Italic gallery is presenting Chromeography – an exhibition of photography curated by Stephen Coles that celebrates the shiny side of lettering.

All of the farewells

That’s it for this week. Keep your stick on the ice!

Thanks to Grant Hutchinson for delivering yet another great round of new typefaces! Dingbat.

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