Type News: Soft-Serve with Bacon

What a week! We have some lip-smacking type and equally scrumptious news for you.

Let’s begin with our pal Unicode. “Canadian Syllabics sh” and “Rightwards Arrow with Loop” received new definitions in the “Curator’s Code.” It remains to be seen whether screen-readers, etc., will be able to tell the different meanings that these characters apparently now signify. (Whether you think the “Curator’s Code” is useful is another thing entirely.) Meanwhile, every character is undergoing re-definition by the Fake Unicode Consortium. Enjoy such instant classics as “Unimpressed Rabbit,” “Monocle of Disapproval,” and “Soft-Serve Ice Cream.”

With that fun out of the way, let’s serve up this week’s new type. Color us impressed — there’s no scratching words in the dirt here:

Swiss art director Juri Zaech starts off another week of new type with the charmingly decorative Frontage. A multitude of dimensional and textural effects can be created by layering and colorifying the five distinct styles — including a unique cast shadow variation. This all-caps “façade signage” sans is built to be mixed, matched, and stacked to your signmaking heart’s content. An additional sixth weight — not included in the retail collection — is also available. Frontage Outline is “free for a tweet.”

Madelinette provides a lovely, unstuffy take on early 1900s handwriting. In a style that’s considered to be “a modern alternative” to Spencerian scripts, this face is lightweight and natural — maintaining the subtle roughness produced by a steel-nibbed pen on paper. Designed by illustrator and lettering artist Crystal Kluge and brought up to OpenType speed by Stuart Sandler, Madelinette contains plenty of ligatures, beginning and ending forms, swashes, and stylistic alternates.

Peter Mohr’s second release for OurType provides a refined display counterpart to his didone-esque Fayon family. Fayon Grande is a condensed headliner of ample contrast and x-height, with uniquely leafy terminals, softened hairline serifs, and an impressive range of nineteen weights — from thin through extra black.

Max Phillips describes the inaugural release from his very own Signal foundry as “an ice cream headache of a typeface”. We can’t possibly disagree. Vibro combines strict geometry with concentric repetition to the visual extreme. Phillips has also taken pains to provide cleverly “mortised” diacritics — allowing Vibro to “trample basic standards of legibility in over 130 languages.” Following up on the award-winning ways of his FF Spinoza, Max’s stripy wonder recently nabbed a 2012 Certificate of Excellence from the Type Director Club.

Wood Type Revival’s latest typographic resuscitation is a gruff little number in an wide slab style. Trent Walton took design cues from an 8-line cut of 19th century wood type — originally part of the David Knox & Co. foundry — and digitized two styles of Grecian Light Face. Available in distressed and “clean, precise redraw” varieties.

And now: watch the water roll down from the new type to the type news. (Yes I am listening to Soul Coughing while I’m writing this, why do you ask?)

Mark your calendars!

We leave you this week with some incredible and mesmirizing Handmade Type. Have a happy St. Patrick’s Day and a great week!

Thanks to Grant Hutchinson for getting on the bus and delivering this week’s new type.

 

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