Type News: Manicules & Pedicules

It’s the first Saturday in MonOctober! How about some news? — and, of course, some huge new type:

We start off this week’s fresh faces with a pair of inaugural font releases. First up is Typiqal Mono from the London-based Temple studio. This finessed, single-weight sans is based on tight, monospaced geometry and a “technical feel.” Suitably equipped for both wayfinding and coding.

Nika is another debut release, this time from Arlo Vance’s brand-spanking new Typecaste foundry. Weighty, wedge-shaped serifs are clamped onto a hairline frame, making for an enjoyably offbeat display face. Maybe it’s just us, but does this font look like a stringbean teenager wearing oversized sneakers?

James Puckett and his Dunwich Type Founders have revisited their popular gothic sans family, Lorimer. The aptly named Lorimer № 2 and Lorimer № 2 Condensed replace the original, expanding the range and normalizing some of the typographic “oddities.” James also added a sharp-looking stencil variation based on the black weight — which just happens to be on sale over at Fontspring for a dollar and change.

Carla Zetina-Yglesias and the prodigious Chank Diesel have unleashed the lively Aguas Frescas. Two bouncy, hand-drawn display faces that can be combined into colourful layered settings or left to their own devices. There are plenty of alternate lowercase characters too.

Gothic graffiti written with textura spraypaint. XXII Blasphema is an extensive, 15 style “urban” blackletter by Lecter Johnson for Hamburg based Doubletwo Studios. We’re seen similar contemporary interpretations of blackletter forms in faces such as Underware’s Fakir and House Industries’ Blaktur — but Blasphema oozes a certain attitude that’s straight off the street.

One of a pair of recent releases from Lost Type Co-op, Homestead lays down a solid, geometric foundation of headline-savvy, textural slabbiness. Designed by Luke Lisi, the package includes six distinct styles built for creative intermingling.

Already an extensive collection of elegant text and display faces, Typonine’s Marlene gets yet another boost with the addition of Marlene High. Exaggerated contrast and “wispy” serifs feature throughout the four new weights and their true italics.

What’s better than a free font? How about a free font from TypeTogether? Veronika Burian conceived and constructed Birdy on the spot during London’s recent Graphic Design Walk, and now she’s giving it away. Sporting angular, upright, and calligraphically-inspired lines — but only a limited character set. However, Veronika has mentioned that … “An extension is in progress.”

If you’ve never been on a type walk, once you’ve read Paul Shaw’s account of a recent type walk in Berlin, it should be clear how one might inspire you to create some wicked letters of your own. And should you create those letters, you might want to enter this year’s type competition from the TDC. Or you could take that inspiration with you to Type Camp — the 2012 schedule is out!

Before we get too far ahead of ourselves, though, let’s take another look back at ATypI 2011. reactions to the conference have gone from a trickle to an outright deluge (or at least it feels that way):

Whew! And now, for the rest of this week’s news:

For the calendar obsessives among us:

  • Typographic Matchmaking in the City is happening on the evening of October 4. If you can’t make it to New York but want to attend, there will be a live webcast.
  • On October 6 in Chicago, join David Demaree, Jackson Cavanaugh, Nick Sherman, Bill Davis, and me for “The New Web Typography.”

That’s it for this week. It’s breakfast time around here … care for some bacon? Let us know in the comments!

Thanks to Grant Hutchinson for his huge specimens — what? — and for bringing us this week’s new type.

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