Type News: ibid.

All of this has happened before, and all of it will happen again. But let’s not let that stop us! We have an abundance of new-seeming things for you to enjoy.

New Type

Not only did Letters From Sweden pop out a “2.0” version of Siri — their inaugural release from last year — but they also introduced a new historical display face. Kumla is a idiosyncratic, single weight sans constructed from extrapolated linear forms. Initially spotted by Göran Söderström on the façade of the Kumla Skofabrik factory, he discusses the history and process behind both the face and the town that inspired it: in the footsteps of a 1920s signmaker.

Originally conceived nearly two decades ago, Franck Jalleau’s Morisawa-winning Scripto is the latest face to grace the growing Bureau des Affaires Typographiques catalogue. Gestural strokes and modulation, a semi-connected flow, and “characters with different energies” afford an incredible range of personality — clearly influenced by ancient Roman cursives.

Under his new Looseleaf Fonts banner, Nathanael Bonnell has caught and released Walleye. Designed for use in long text settings, the four styles of this crisp serif family cover a lot of ground. Calligraphically considered stokes and “airy letterforms” enhance the face’s very readable nature. As well, thoughtfully integrated Latin, Greek, and Cyrillic character sets provide extensive language support.

Making its first appearance in the Storm Type Foundry quiver almost twenty years ago, the distinctively inscriptional Mramor family included both a small set of text faces alongside the stylized titling capitals. Over time, those text weights were replaced by the expanded range of Amor Serif (and its sans cousin), leaving the display weights to be reinvigorated as Mramor Pro. This sharply cut display face now features an array of alternates, ligatures, accurate small caps, Cyrillic glyphs, and numerous sets of figures.

Schizotype’s Dave Rowland showed up this week with another casual, sign painter’s script with a vintage vibe. Ollie may be bouncy and bold on the outside, but under the hood lies some seriously sophisticated OpenType chutzpah — controlling close to 900 glyphs.

“There’s no reason Courier has to look terrible.” Taking this statement as a challenge, screenwriter John August and type designer (and professional steadyicam operator!) Alan Dague-Greene collaborated on Courier Prime — their “better” version of the ubiquitous typewriter face. Without sacrificing the bland uniformity (or fixed pitch metrics) which make Bud Kettler’s original the de facto choice of screenwriters, they tuned up the creakiest parts. For instance, the bold weight is bolder and the italics — well, now they’re actually italics.

What better way to wrap up a veritable salmagundi of new type than with a beefy bifurcate. Spencer Charles has channelled and massaged some classic American woodtype into the likes of Black Creek. This fanciful Tuscan sports a minimal — yet historically appropriate — character set, plus small caps and a handful of charming “catchwords”.

News

You got me, and baby I got news.

Events

“What has been is what will be, and what has been done is what will be done; there is nothing new under the sun.” Really? Tell that to these upcoming events:

No shadow here

That’s it, this time around, and rest assured: there won’t be a six-week delay for the next edition — see you next week!

Thanks to Grant Hutchinson for reporting on this week’s new type. Thanks to Grant Hutchinson for reporting on this week’s new type. Thanks to Grant Hutchinson for reporting on this week’s new type. What.

 

Comments are closed on this entry.

Subscribe for Updates

Blog RSS feed

Recent Entries

Categories

Archived Entries

2014
Jan
2013
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
2012
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec
2011
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec
2010
Jan
Feb
Apr
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec
2009
May
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec