Type News: Help!

It’s an action-packed week in the type world. We have news galore—and eight new typefaces!

If print is your thing, you’re in luck this week. Seb Lester writes about his three beautiful new prints for I Love Typography. Typotheque has released its 2011 pocket calendar / sketchbook. The Birds and the Beasts have a printed a beautiful love letter to typography. And there are a (dwindling) number of the print edition of 8 Faces #2 still available—get them while you can!

Love the past? John Berry has a fine writeup of the recent Type Americana conference. Over at Co.Design, John Rambow profiles the Hamilton Wood Type Museum. You can help make Linotype: The Film a reality by funding it on Kickstarter. Regarding a different kind of kick, Stephen Heller uncovers a gem about the Beatles’ logo, thanks to Simon Garfield’s recent Just My Type. Also of note: Paul Shaw continues his coverage of the use of type in the 2010 U.S. election season, with analysis of the Tea Party’s adoption of Gotham and other peculiar things.

Let’s take a peek into the future, with the latest on webfonts. The draft WOFF specification has entered last call; if you have anything to contribute, you have until December 14 to make yourself heard. Have you ever come across a site using Typekit and wondered what fonts the site used? Wonder no more: Matt Jacobs has created a JavaScript bookmarklet for viewing Typekit colophons. Miguel Sousa previews Microsoft’s DirectWrite software, coming to the web with Internet Explorer 9 and the Windows version of Firefox 4. Speaking of Firefox, John Daggett shows us some of the OpenType support coming in version 4. If you love the prospects of type on the web, you can help guide us forward by joining the Typekit team. And for those of us interested in using type well, Christopher Murphy points us to Tim Brown’s nifty Modular Scale tool.

And now, let’s move on to the present, with a metric ton of new type!

Custodia type specimen

Feel like going Dutch? Fred Smeijers has remastered and expanded his Custodia family with semibold and bold weights. Now in OpenType Pro format, the update incorporates subtle improvements to glyph detailing, spacing, and the addition of italic stylistic alternates.

FF Suhmo type specimen

Take a letter, or pick a word … contemporary, playful, spontaneous, moody. These are all characteristics that can be applied to Alex Rütten’s tasty FF Suhmo. This robust family with its “correspondence” underpinnings, is certainly inspired by classic typewriter fonts such as Courier and American Typewriter, but provides much more versatility and depth. Be sure to read Jürgen Siebert’s background post on his new favorite typeface.

Brilliant type specimen

If you like the strong and seriffed type, Igor Labudovic’s Brilliant might be just what you’re after. Three weights of modernized antiqua, featuring a solid, industrial stencil cut. Very impressive and very readable.

Aeris type specimen

Billed as a contemporary book face, Tom Grace’s Aeris combines the proportions and rhythm generally found in a sans serif text family with the higher contrast and subtle strokes of more calligraphic faces. Featuring two variants of the standard weight set, as well as a display version, Aeris maintains an aloof, casual appearance in both text and display.

Steinweiss Script specimen

From distinctive scrawl to lively script. The multi-weight, multi-variation Steinweiss Script family sprung from Michael Doret’s work for Taschen Publishing, and is based on the famous calligraphy of Alex Steinweiss—“The Inventor of the Modern Album Cover.” A portion of the sales of this font go to Mr. Steinweiss himself.

Runda type specimen

In the midst of all these new display and serif types, there’s a pair of ample sans families to share as well. There’s something familiar and straightforward about the clean, grotesque geometry of Runda from Mark Caneso.

Actium type specimen

The unusual diagonal contrast evident in the six weights and two styles of Gerben Dollen’s Actium is more often attributed as a trait found in serif faces.

Ico type specimen

To top off this massive pile of recent type releases, how about something a little more utilitarian? And what says utility better than a dingbat font? Ondrej Jób designed his monolinear Ico series with simplicity in mind. Three thematic set of images—Weather, Time, and Phone—were inspired by the iconography found on classic monochrome LCD displays.

It wouldn’t be a week in November without a new monospace font, but sadly this week we have to content ourselves with a promise. Bruno Maag previews the upcoming Ubuntu Mono and discusses some of the challenges designing that kind of face.

There are a few upcoming events of note:

That’s it for this week’s news. Please let us know what we missed in the comments, and enjoy some lettering this weekend.

Thanks to Grant Hutchinson for writing about this week’s ample new type—and for keeping you informed while I was away!

  • 1. Fehler’s avatar Fehler Nov 20, 2010

    Thank you so much for the very kind mention Mr Vorhes, it’s very much appreciated. For anyone who hasn’t take a look at Mr Brown’s ‘Modular Scale’, I strongly urge you to do so now.

    Having just hosted the very lovely Mr Bas Jacobs of Underware at the University of Ulster’s Art College yesterday, may I be so bold as to add to the list of the week’s highlights?

    Mr Jacobs spoke about Underware’s latest project, the ‘Book of War, Mortification and Love’ by Ruud Linssen. Set in Fakir and – literally – printed in the author’s own blood, it’s a book you really should add to your library.

    Thanks again for the mention.

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