Type News: Futuropolis

This week, we go big on type and visit the future. So let’s get right to it — with this week’s new type:

Canada Type’s Patrick Griffin and Nancy Harris Rouemy originally created Crescendo for The Lives They Lived, 2009 issue of The New York Times Magazine. Available for public consumption at long last, this “exotic tri-line” is simply screaming for some creative chromatic applications.

This week’s second release from Canada Type is an expanded revival of Friedrich Kleukens’ metal-era Didone, Ratio Modern. The five styles in this tidy family have a subtle softness, especially evident in the shape of the serifs. Nice touches include just the right amount of alternates, a smattering of unexpected ligatures, and significant language support.

Nomenclative rhyming aside, Craig Eliason’s Ambicase Fatface is exactly as advertised. Taking cues from its Modern sibling, this all-beef hybrid is loaded with OpenType pizzazz, intelligent swashiness, and a ton of headline hugging attitude. If you intend on going big — and you really should — Mr. Eliason has kindly provided an extra-refined Poster cut.

Like its namesake, Jessica Hische’s Brioche is light, tasty, and a little bit fancy. The exceptionally clean roman and italic show well in both text and all-caps settings. As per usual, Ms Hische has sprinkled her own special touches everywhere — swooping terminals, swashes galore, and knife-sharp details.

František Štorm has completed his Jannon humanist type system with the release of Jannon Sans — the stylistic companion to his classic 17th century Garalde. Seven weights from light through “medium bold” with gracefully compact italics.

Also fresh from the Czech foundry is Štorm’s idiomatic Enamelplate. This four weight display family is based on the lettering from a centuries old brewery in the town of Chříč. Extrapolated and modernized, Enamelplate still manages to retain the industrial vernacular of the source.

TypeTrust is living large through the latest from newcomer Lucas Sharp. Hera Big is an ambitious first outing for Sharp, sporting sixteen styles across eight “lusciously detailed” weights, teardrop terminals, and some of the sexiest italics we’ve ever seen.

Incorporating the structure of historical French and Dutch typefaces, Dieter Hofrichter’s Erato steps out of its 17th century box by simplifying many of the formal elements. The result is a very comfortable and contemporary transitional face. Erato comes in light, regular, and bold weights with complimentary italics — fully-equipped with OpenType niceties.

And now, the rest of news:

That’s it for this week. What did we miss? Let us know in the comments.

Thanks to Grant Hutchinson for deftly guiding us through this week’s new type.

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