Type News: Fundamentum

It’s a new year. And we’re resolving to continue bringing you all kinds of type-related goodies. [Ed. — What else would we do? Sheesh.] Let’s start with the goodest stuff, some dandy new type!

To kick off, we’re catching up on a few of last month’s late arrivals, starting with Kunihiko Okano’s Quintet. Photo-Lettering’s custom cut of Okano’s calligraphic script features three variations of the “double-stroke in a single-stroke” style, originally designed as part of his KABK Type]Media studies. Three different flavours of the face can be layered and combined using Photo-Lettering’s letterer setterer in variety of ways, providing a fair amount of depth and contrast. Apparently, we’ll just have to wait patiently for full OpenType version of Quintet Script to be released, along with the serif and italic styles. Here’s hoping.

Tomi Haaparanta and his Suomi Type Foundry managed to sneak out the tidy, two weight Tow just before the holidays. This simple headliner sports slabby, notched serifs and subtle diagonal contrast. There’s a nice selection of ligatures, some tasteful fleurons, and a few quirky character traits (like the stub-nosed lowercase a and the lollipop-headed binocular g) which offer some interesting balance to the script-like italics.

Inspired by the clean geometry of Aldo Novarese’s Eurostile, Frio takes a more elliptical approach to the monoline sans. With a slight curvaceousness, the five weights and three widths of Kristians Šics’ design have thrown off much of the stiffness associated with other grid-based, linear typefaces.

Berlin’s Büro Dunst have expanded their impressive humanist grotesque family with the release of Novel Sans Condensed Pro. This horizontally economical six weight addition fits in nicely amidst its award winning sans, serif, and surprisingly balanced monospaced brethren. And oh! You have to appreciate that sexy, sinewy italic lowercase y.

Jeremy Dooley’s increasingly voluminous Aviano series of display faces surfaces once again. Aviano Contrast continues the extended stance, pared-down lines, and deco-esque flair of its predecessors — but with higher contrast — arguably structured like a serifless didone. As if there weren’t enough choices throughout the Aviano clan as is, each weight in this new family includes a boggling twelve sets of stylistic alternates.

Matthew Carter’s dignified Postoni face has graced the headlines of The Washington Post since the late 1990s. Expanded and finessed by Font Bureau’s Richard Lipton, Jill Pichotta, and Dyana Weissman ten years later, it is finally available in commercial form as the renamed Stilson.

“I absolutely love using a pointed brush for lettering.” So says Laura Worthington — and it shows. Her latest script packs a lot of liveliness into each curve and transition — from upswept hairline to voluptuous downstroke. Rosarian features two weights of strong, modulated forms that can be set either as connected or unconnected text. There’s a plethora of swashes, alternates, and complementary ornaments to boot.

Based in Copenhagen and Tokyo, the Kontrapunkt design agency often creates unique fonts specifically for visual identity and other client projects. Wanting to share some of that typographic love, they have graciously posted two sets of namesake display faces based on that work. Kontrapunkt is a three style hybrid sans with a square, modern stance and angular joinery. Kontapunkt Bob is a simple, two weight geometric slab. Both families are free, in exchange for a short tweet or kindly post.

Last of all, Alejandro Paul has finished putting a fresh coat of “Pro” paint onto another five faces from the eponymous Charles Bluemlein Script Collection. Included in this update are the sultry Dr Sugiyama, energetic Mr Dehaviland, forward thinking Mrs St-Delafieldh, Herr Von Mueller’s staccato tone, and the pleasantly plump Mrs Sheppards.

And now, with steely resolve, we bring you a double serving of newsy things:

That’s it for this week, but hardly for this year. There’ll be plenty of news to be had (though hopefully not this much each week). See you next time!

Thanks to Grant Hutchinson for hopping in his time machine and joining us in 2012! For sharing this week’s new type with us, too. What.

 

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