Type News: Formerly Known As

[Imagine a single glyph that represents “Welcome to the latest Type News! Let’s get started.”]

New Type

There’s been a lot of pent up excitement surrounding the release of Toshi Omagari’s long awaited resuscitation of W. A. Dwiggin’s classic Metro. Now available through Linotype, Metro Nova is a versatile and expansive family, consisting of seven regular widths — from thin through extra black — and six condensed styles, plus their italic counterparts.

Also fresh from the Linotype factory comes Lucca — a “friendly humanist grotesque” by João Henrique Lopes. Bevelled terminals and angular strokes reminiscent of a square-nibbed pen provide a calligraphic flair, while remaining remarkably readable in longer text settings.

The bogglingly prolific Alejandro Paul has released yet another updated tribute to 19th century penmanship. Seashore Pro brings the refined, backslanted style of the reverse contrast script up to OpenType speed. This wavy display face sports in excess of 900 glyphs, including some serious swash — not white — caps.

The name of Kristians Šics Oro y Plata is Spanish for “gold and silver”. To emphasize the nomenclature, each of the three weights in this stylized blackletter refer to one of Mexico’s colonial silver mining cities — angular Taxco, rounded Zacatecas, and the decorative inline Guanajuato.

Fira Sans is a tidy, four weight family by Erik Spiekermann and Ralph Du Carrois — commissioned by Mozilla for their smartphone-optimized Firefox OS. The influential bones of Spiekermann’s FF Meta are more than evident in this slightly condensed, highly readable design. Give it try for yourself — the current version of this open source family can be downloaded from GitHub.

Lecter Johnson’s Grober Bleistift does more than just hint at the loose, dulled-pencil handwriting of someone in a hurry — it emulates it. Some nicely implemented OpenType programming automatically replaces every second lowercase glyph with a suitably scratchy variation.

Charmante is a simple — yet utterly charming — handstyle face by Slovakian designer Juraj Chrastina. The regular and bold weights each possess their own set of quirky misshapenness, inky details, and casual stroke-ending blobs.

News

There’s nothing dull or blobby about this week’s news!

Events

Are you ready for these?

Signing off, but how?

See you next week — don’t go changing!

Thanks to Grant Hutchinson for another romp through the land of new type!

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