Type News: Embooked

This week, we leap from the page to the screen. Or something like that. In any case, we’ll do it with vigor. So step lively, here comes a brace and bevy of new type.

Designed by Dino dos Santos and Pedro Leai, DSType’s Girga combines the features and details found in nineteenth century Egyptian woodtypes with a strong display sans. The result is a no-nonsense salute to headline type in regular, italic, stencil, engraved, and banner-style cuts.

Dude, it’s time to catch some serious style with Måns Grebäck’s Xtreem — a fresh-faced, staccato script with a totally 80s name and some gnarly, hand-lettered attitude.

Bulgaria’s Karandash foundry has produced an intriguing pair of decorative display faces based on archaic, eastern European letterforms. Vassil Kateliev’s unicase Gaytan Sans and Gaytan Serif are organic and subtly calligraphic display types built on a solid, monoline base. Both styles contain plenty of undulating alternates and — as expected — full Cyrillic language support.

The latest family from Vienna-based Typejockeys is Michael Hochleiter’s extensively researched Henriette. Although it incorporates the flavour of classic Viennese street signs datng back to the 1920s, this beefy serif is not a simple digital clone. Instead, the design was influenced by the numerous historical iterations (and phototype propagated bastardizations) of the original “standardized” typefaces. From this, Hochleiter extrapolated thirty styles across five weights and three width variations. A factory full of additional typographic extras accompany the family, including a “frames” font. All that, plus a lovingly prepared (and voluminously informative) PDF specimen to peruse.

There’s another “Storm” system on the horizon — from the Storm Type Foundry, that is. Rostislav Vaněk set out to create both the sans and serif versions of his Clara type system concurrently. The stylistically coherent families share an ample x-height, a broad range of weights, and an expression of “national character” embodied by his native Czech Republic.

Are you ready to reel in a quartet of mid-century photoset revivals from the Filmotype collection? We are. The artful eye of Rian “Device” Hughes places a pile of playfulness into both Filmotype Power and Filmotype Major — two bouncy sans headliners. Look familiar? The narrower number was used as the titling face for Dr. Seuss’ seminal One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish. Filmotype Panama is a “tipsy” serif that blends casual, Latin-esque style with an extended vacation. This particular face was brought up to OpenType speed by Canada Type’s Patrick Griffin. The final font in the foursome is Charles Gibbons’ updating of Filmotype Adonis — a lightly modulated, hand-lettered sans.

Ramiz Guseynov has expanded his foxy series of faces with Fox Grotesque — sitting comfortably between the loopy, upright italic of Fox and the controlled geometry of Fox Sans. This display-focused family sports curvy tails, jaunty tittles, and a handsome set of blockish alternates.

Although the name may suggest otherwise, Martin Aleith’s Gratis certainly not a freebie. This blackletter headline grabber from the Gestalten garage is seriously angular, astonishingly readable, and heavy metal ready.

When Hubert Jocham redesigned the logotype for his eponymous foundry last summer, people asked him repeatedly what typeface it was based on. Well, it wasn’t based on anything … until now. After much fretting and fiddling, Jocham was born — a bold, single weight script in lively upright and italic styles.

With a singular mind, let’s venture into a riot of news:

There’s a whole slew of web-specific news this week:

Get your calendars at the ready:

And that brings us to the end of yet another large collection of small details, your weekly Type News. Thanks for joining us; see you next week!

Thanks to Dave Dawson for covering so ably for me last week and to Grant Hutchinson for once again bringing us such an abundant mid-Spring harvest typefaces!

Comments are closed on this entry.

Subscribe for Updates

Blog RSS feed

Recent Entries

Categories

Archived Entries

2014
Jan
2013
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
2012
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec
2011
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec
2010
Jan
Feb
Apr
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec
2009
May
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec