Type News, Eh?

Happy Canada Day! Get yourself some poutine and settle in for this week’s news, beginning with some grand new type.

Sergei Egorov’s Neacademia is the first of two new families from Rosetta, a foundry specializing in multiscript typography. A Latin and Cyrillic serif with a deep and seasoned background — touching on multiple typefaces by 15th century Italian punchcutter, Francesco Griffo da Bologna. Perhaps its most interesting feature is the scarcity of kerning pairs. Instead, Sergei made clever use of contextual alternate forms to improve overall letterspacing.

Also from Rosetta is Nassim, a contemporary text face in four weights by Titus Nemeth. Both the Latin and Arabic versions of Nassim were developed in tandem, producing authentic designs which aren’t necessarily influenced by each other.

The Sorkin Type Co. has popped a quartet of display faces into the Google Web Fonts directory, each inspired by a familiar source. Nicole Fally’s Hammersmith One is a low contrast sans, with brush lettering undertones and whispers of Johnston and Gill. Riccardo De Franceschi provides a trio of faces, starting with Goblin One, a wide Latin based on a hand-painted pub sign. Riccardo’s Asset is an extended fat face similar to the heavy, engraved serifs found on American currency and Gravitas One is a UK-flavoured, Bodoni-esque advertising type.

Facetype has added the vivacious Marlowe Escapade to their “rat pack” of linear, Art Deco display fonts. The delightful doodads and accoutrements of Escapade join the existing regular, “Swirl”, and “Cocktail” styles — providing a decadent selection of alternates and ligatures.

Brighton’s StudioMakgill created the quaintly industrial Central Avenue as part of a modern identity for an exhibition celebrating a distinctly Victorian-era event. The awkward charm of the original handpainted sans remains, enhanced with a set of superscript capitals.

Madita is a cheery upright script by Hubert Jocham. Each of the six weights — light through bold — combine the characteristics of a highly legible sans serif, a flowing script, and a loopy italic.

The latest release from Éditions 205 is steeped in publishing (and biblical) history. Alcala is based on a typeface dating back to the 16th century and used to print the first polyglot bible, Biblia Poliglota Complutense. First drawn by designers Damien Gautier and Quentin Margat in 1995, this freshly revised family consists of roman, italic, and bold styles.

And now for a heaping helping of news, best served with backbacon and brown bread.

That’s it for this week. Too many mistakes? Not enough Canada? Let us know what you think in the comments, you hosers.

A tip of the toque to Grant Hutchinson for covering this week’s new type. Have a great Fête du Canada, Grant!

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