Type News: Dry Transfer

Ahoy! We’ve charted a course and are heading straight for a week’s worth of new type.

Chartwell Specimen

When we covered the first release of Travis Kochel’s Chartwell back in March of last year, we were gobsmacked by its clever use of stylistic alternates to dynamically visualize chunks of numerical data. Now that FontFont has taken the face under its wing, FF Chartwell has been pumped up (and to the right) with additional chart styles and more flexible OpenType-powered formatting. The original Pies, Lines, and Bars are now joined by new “Polar Series” styles, including RoseRings, and Radar — as well as a vertical bar variation.

Scuba Specimen

But that’s not the only FaceFace from the FontFont FolkFolk. There’s also a natty pair of sans families to show off this week. The first to surface is Felix Braden’s FF Scuba — an “offline companion” to Matthew Carter’s ubiquitous Verdana. Braden has created a balanced, yet dynamic sans with a tighter set stance and wide range of weights that still manages to blend with its screen-biased contemporary. Try it out for yourself — the regular weights of FF Scuba OT and FF Scuba Web are available free for a limited time.

Tisa Sans Specimen

In one last bit of FontFont news, the much anticipated unslab’d sister of Mitja Miklavčič’s FF Tisa has finally arrived. FF Tisa Sans sports the same range of weights and typographic features as its serif counterpart, but with specifically “fine-tuned” traits — such as reduced ink traps, adjusted colour density, and a softening of the family’s distinctive stroke endings.

Refren Specimen

To celebrate its third birthday, Dušan Jelesijević’s Tour de Force foundry invited the cheerful Refren to the party. This simple, single weight monoline features a casual, handwritten vibe and a stylish set of alternate initial caps.

Bulo Specimen

The term ‘bulo’ is Catalan for ‘hoax’ — but Jordi Embodas’ Bulo isn’t trying to pull something over on us. This lightly condensed sans is about as straightforward as they come — although Embodas does describe the structure as “a mechanical force with a little humanist fragrance”. Compact ascenders and descenders, prominent x-height, and a pleasant tonality make for a very readable five weight face.

Magallanes Specimen

Another week, another extensive text family from Latinotype. Daniel Hernández’s Magallanes is a gently extended, “neo humanist” sans with subtle calligraphic hooks and lines. The eight weights cover a lot of water, but only vary a little bit in width while sailing from ultra light through black.

Sugarplum Specimen

Something sweet is behind the counter of the Tart Workshop this week. Crystal Kluge’s handlettering artistry and Stuart Sandler’s technical chops have prepared a double batch of Sugarplum — a playfully rough and tumble hand-drawn headliner. Two weights, an extra bouncy baseline, and just enough alternates to keep the type dancing in your head.

Krul Specimen

Ramiro Espinoza’s Krul has a long and winding heritage. From the 17th century Dutch calligraphy that inspired the often overlooked Amsterdamse Krulletter — or “curly letter” style — to mid-century drinking establishment signage and the meticulous lettering of Jan Willem Joseph Visser. Espinoza gives Krul a unique revivalist spin — painstakingly recreating the complexity, contrast, and flourish of this historical face.

Avenir Next Rounded Specimen

It had to happen sooner or later. Under the watchful eye of master Adrian Frutiger, Linotype’s Akira Kobayashi and Sandra Winter have taken the sans serif belt sander to one of the foundry’s most beloved text faces. Avenir Next Rounded extends the family with four weights of softened, understated “contemporary variants”.

And now for the rest of the happenings this week:

The sun is shining in Brooklyn, so that’s all for this week!

Big ups to Grant Hutchinson for ripping another week’s worth of type.

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