Type News: Desert Chrome

This week’s things are shiny, but they’re no strawberry shortcake. Ahem. Partake of some news and new type!

New Type

Shamelessly uninhibited. Neil Summerour’s Shameless makes no excuses for its unabashedly feisty behaviour. An angular handwritten script with a relentless motion — like the teeth of a reciprocating saw — produced through the smart application of a seemingly endless supply of contextual variations. Multiple stylistic sorts, swashes, flyaways, and “responsive titling alts” prove just how unencumbered this design really is, with over 2,200 glyphs in the “standard” version alone. As if that number wasn’t audacious enough, the “deluxe” variation sports a couple hundred more — plus Summerour’s promise of future additions and upgrades.

With a sophistication uncommon to many of Virus’ more idiosyncratic typefaces, Doctrine provides a large family that deftly blends mid-century neo-grotesque, humanist, and geometric sans influences. Throughout the five weight range, the typographic tag team of Jonathan Abbott, Jonathan Barnbrook, and Julián Moncada apply consistency (and unorthodox charm) with an ample helping of those trademark Virus alternates, an voluminous selection of ligatures, and numerous figure sets.

Bringing a bit more muscle to the table is Doctrine Stencil, a “utilitarian” display version based on the same sans frame. Taking inspiration from the wordmark of North Korea’s rather iffy national airline, this five weight family features four stylistic sets, incorporating both the alternate letterforms found in the text styles and various stencil cut options.

Lev Berry’s Monstre brings a quaint set of dimensional characters out of the realm of French ephemera and up to OpenType speed. Five carefully prepared layers — retaining the “slight imperfections” of the hand-painted orginal — can be manipulated for limitless lighting and shading effects. Try it out for yourself. It’s a free download under Creative Commons licensing.

The latest release from Fontsmith is Phil Garnham’s impressive (and expansive) FS Emeric. Covering an eleven-weight range, the entire family maintains a clean, sharp aesthetic — open counters, chiselled terminals, subtle “micro-modulations”, and an overall textual warmth. Tying together the ideals and the design of Garnham’s glyphic progeny, a series of limited edition screenprinted posters were created specifically for the launch — one celebrating each weight in the family.

If ever there was a perfect name to apply to a geometric sans, Lineto’s Circular might well be it. This is the second release from Berlin’s Laurenz Brunner after his acclaimed, Swiss-flavoured Akkurat. The functional book, medium, bold, and black weights — along with their tidy italic mates — maintain a balance between what Brunner refers to in Squaring the Circle as “conceptual rigour, skilled workmanship, and measured idiosyncrasy.”

Ulrike Wilhelm’s LiebeRuth mixes the mojo found in chewy, retro headliners like ITC American Typewriter with the welcoming, organic handstyle we’ve come to know and love. The four slabby weights are simply jam-packed full of quirky curlycues, loopy swashes, ball terminalia, and more alternates than you can shake a stick at.

Designed by Mark and Doris Ho-Kane, Uchronia takes its name from a term coined by French philosopher Charles Bernard Renouvier in 1876, referring to a fictional — often utopian — version of history. This is a classic titling face befitting the idyls of the definition — with graceful lines, minimal adornment, and a modicum of alternates, including inscriptional and calligraphic punctuation.

News

Events

Segue, this way:

Shake out those shoes

It’s time to go home! See you next week.

Thanks to Grant Hutchinson for risking life and limb to lead this week’s new type into our little oasis.

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