Type News: Big Gulp

1.2 liters of power! It’s a type-heavy (top-heavy?) week, so let’s dive right in:

Ondrej Jób’s Remi explores the modular, monospaced sans — but through the oddly proportioned lens of a segmented digital display. As an example, the lowercase forms of this five weight family are just half the height of the capitals — with shorter, more balanced capitals available via stylistic set. Other typographic features not generally found in such a typewriter-esque face include compound glyphs of common measurement units, a whopping ten sets of numerals, and some wonderfully inventive italics.

Mr Robot is anything but mechanical. To prove this point, there are three different ways to set this condensed, angular display face. Designed by Hipopotam Studio’s Aleksandra and Daniel Mizielińscy to deliver bold, colourful headlines in their upcoming children’s book, individual weights and stylistic sets can be layered and styled for dimensionality. But that’s not all. Triple type each character in a word and turn on the contextual alternate feature — magical glyph alignment occurs before your very eyes. See the Mr Robot User Manual if you don’t believe us.

Along with G-Type’s slick, relaunched site that we mentioned last week, the equally dapper Nick Cooke also released Rollerscript. As implied by the name, this personable face is based on writing with a rollerball pen, in contrast with the more formal nib-work of Nick’s previous Olicana scripts. Like Olicana, Rollerscript features rough and smooth styles, plus dozens of natural, spontaneous ligatures. Generous amounts of OpenType-powered extras — multiple underlines, icons, arrows, and emoticons — are tossed in for added authenticity.

The first of a pair of new typefaces from the Sudtipos foundry is a fresh, monolinear sans. Ariel Di Lisio’s Uma is a deceptively simple family consisting of just light and bold weights which are soft, rounded, and airy. Subtle tails, clever alternates, and a series of ligatures reminiscent of Lubalin’s Avant Garde Gothic dispense a decent amount of function and whimsy.

Also from Sudtipos comes Avellana Pro — a straight forward, upright packaging face from the typographic tag team of Angel Koziupa and Alejandro Paul. Yet another versatile option in their seemingly endless supply of collaborative, condensed display fonts like semi-stencilled Aladin, pudgy Cupcake, and saucy Primavera.

Once again finding inspiration in the sign painter’s trade, Blue Vinyl Fonts’ Jess Latham has produced a somewhat Fancier Script. Bold, but not too bold. Casual, but not too casual. A script where contextual alternates and tasteful ligatures are both plentiful and tastefully implemented.

Every once in a while, we slide from the sublime and the ridiculous. If Fancier Script is the former, then Intellecta Design’s Bradstone-Parker Script is surely the latter. The extravagant penmanship of Charles Paxton Zaner has been channelled (and arguably amped up) in the contrasty, “voluptuous”, and seriously italic letterforms of this 19th century throwback. An absurd number of uppercase and lowercase alternates, ornaments, optional “tails”, and preset words complete the package.

Calligraphic didone? Connected italic semi-serif? The specific style of Alecko is difficult to pigeonhole. Maybe that’s the point. Heavy or low contrast? Engraved or solid? Connected or loose? All options are provided in the five variations of this flexible display face from Bulgaria’s EvolutionFonts.

Finishing off a rather voluminous week of new type is a trifecta of mid-century revivals from the Filmotype collection. First up is Filmotype Lucky — a spunky, casual script with a handwritten vibe. This smooth monoline originally sprung from the pen of Ray Baker and as with all Filmotype rereleases, it has been tuned and expanded from the original film masters. Next on the list is one of the first connected brush scripts available from the company. Charles Gibbons’s 1955 Filmotype Havana is a less nubby, more condensed version of the previously updated Filmotype Horizon. Our final face of the day is Filmotype Rose, a deco-flavoured didone. Also designed by Charles Gibbons, Rose pops out some serious period punch with a predominant footprint.

That’s a lot of lovely Latin letters! We show other scripts when we can, but dabbling here won’t give you the same level of experience you’d likely get from one of the upcoming “Non-Latin Intensive” sessions from the TDC. First is Cyrillic, from Friday, March 2, until Sunday, March 4, with Maxim Zhukov. Then: beginning on the Ides of March and running through Saturday, March 17, Nadine Chahine leads “Arabic Demystefied.” Both should be excellent — so act quickly!

Speaking of quick, the rest of the news is alive, and it shouldn’t kill your whole weekend (this time):

Thanks for reading! We’ll see you again next time, right? … Right?

Thanks to Grant Hutchinson for soldiering through an immense week of new type!

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